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Apparently Maura had shopping plans

8 Feb

I get interesting emails from Maura’s teacher. Things like “She’s bringing home food, check the backpack!”and “So Maura brought in a white cell phone that obviously doesn’t belong to her” and “Hey, so Maura brought in some sort of wine glass and a curtain? Just so you’re aware, it’s in her backpack, wrapped up safely.”

Oh yes, I’m always eager to open up an email from Maura’s teacher because the possibilities are endless.

BTW, the cell phone was her brother’s, and it wasn’t a curtain but the fancy tablecloth – because Maura’s always prepped for a fancy dinner.

Today, an email pops up from Maura’s teacher.

Hi Phoebe, 

Maura brought a Dooney and Bourke bag with about $120 in cash in it to school today.  I hid the bag in my filing cabinet.  Do you have time to pick it up sometime today?  

Well, don’t we look all fancy pants?

This is the purse in question –

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A couple of weeks ago, our local Goodwill moved into a new location, and to celebrate, pulled out all this high end stuff. My friend spotted this bag and was all “OMG Phoebe, you must own this purse!” And so it came home with me. Maura spotted it and instantly went “Ooooo….”

Last night, she ventured into my room, and came out with the bag. I was all “You can’t steal my purses!” and her response was a non-verbal “You can’t stop me!”

Now, I’m not big on different types of purses, but I realized after doing a Google search why the teachers were all “OMG, she has THIS purse here” – because it’s like a $200 purse.

What can I say, Maura has good taste.

I went up to the school to retrieve the items. Maura’s teacher retrieved the purse, which Maura instantly latched on to.

I looked at her. “Maura, you know you’re not supposed to take Mom’s purses.”

Maura just ignored me.

“I’ll make you a deal.” I said to her. “You can keep the bag for the rest of the school day, but you have to give me the money.”

Maura sighed loudly in true teenager fashion and said “Fine.” before reaching in and giving me a wad of $20s.

She probably had a shopping trip planned for that money. Meanwhile, I need to figure out who’s missing cash in the house.

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Sometimes you have to listen with your eyes

6 Jan
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picture – adorable lil spider dude on a leaf telling you “sometimes you have to listen with your eyes”. 

 

Maura is somewhat verbal – but not always in English, and not always coherent. So my job is to figure out what she’s trying to convey to me. Yes, I say “my job” because she is trying to communicate, and doing it the best she can – which is her job. Understanding her communication – that’s my job.

Luckily, I have years of practice with such stuff. Even better? Maura is a very expressive girl. When she smiles, her whole face lights up and the smile goes up straight into her eyes. When she’s tired, you don’t have to ask, her weariness is written across her face. And when she’s plotting against me, I know as well, there’s an extra sparkle in that girl’s side eye.

Just now, she was pulling stuff out of an empty tissue box. She loves boxes, loves putting things in them and taking them out. It’s part of our norm, so I didn’t think much of it, but instead, asked her what was in the box.

Mind you – the following bit was all non-verbal on her part.

She got a searching look on her face as she dug around the box, then did her wide-eyed, wide open mouthed surprise look as she showed me what she’d found in the tissue box.

A little round light blue bead.

She presented it to me to ponder.

“Is that an egg?” I asked – because Maura is into eggs, and it was robin’s egg blue. “Or is it a bead?”

She tilted her head a little, her eyes narrowing and her lips pursing, pondering this question herself. I waited for an answer, which came in the form of her aiming the little blue bead-like thing towards her mouth.

“I don’t think that’s food, boo.” I said with a laugh.

She paused, considered my words, then grinned, lowing the bead as if to say “You’re probably right.”, then put it back in the box.

And we both laughed about it.

Some days, Maura is “on” verbally – using words and sentences and making her point. Other days, she’s quieter, not saying much at all. Tonight? Well, it’s Friday, she’s been busy at school all week, and is probably in need of recharging. Being verbal might be too much for her right now.

But she’s still communicating with me. And I am still listening.

 

 

Babyface

5 Dec

The other day, Maura and I went out. Originally, the plan was to just hit the drive-thru Starbuck’s (of which there are 327 in a five mile radius of my house, because Seattle.) But then she spotted “the mall” – aka our local shopping center.

I thought “Well, maybe I can herd the girl to Hallmark’s, where she can pick out something Christmasy.” You know, because the girl loves all things Christmas.

What I love is I think I have control of these situations.

We got three whole minutes into the store before she was like “I’m out.”

We walked through the shopping center. She ooo’ed at the decorations (which were quite nice) and I dissuaded her from a trip to Old Navy (I have enough laundry). We wandered past the food court and to what Maura refers to as the book store.

It’s actually a comic book store. But it sells My Little Pony and Powerpuff Girls graphic novels. Hence, it’s a bookstore.

I love that there are graphic novels like these. Maura doesn’t quite read – not in a phonetic way. She’s learned up to 60 sight words, and can recognize things, but traditional reading is not something she’s getting yet. Graphic novels though tell the story through pictures, and she understands that. So yes, I’m happily plopping down a $20 bill so she can read the way she can read, and enjoy books.

Because she is my kid. She enjoys a good book.

We paid for the book of her choice – a classic Powerpuff Girls version – and headed back to the car with bribes of Starbuck’s. Once in the car, Maura was suddenly bent over the book, nose almost to page, studying it intensely.

 

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Suddenly, I had this moment to study her. My girl who, in her leggings and furry/suede boots and pink coat, was looking quite teenagerish before we left the house. But now, once again, I noted the softness to her face.

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It’s part of whatever it is she has, her Sherlock Syndrome. Her face is softer. It’s probably more of the low muscle tone that she has. Or it could be just regular genetics – when I was 13, people thought I was maybe 10, tops. When I was 18, people thought I was 13.  Maybe it’s a combination of low muscle tone and the family blessing of youthful looks. But she’s still such a kid. The baby of the family who has a babyface.

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Maybe it’s also partially my own filtering of things – in so many ways, Maura is still quite “young”. Other 13 year old girls are trying make up and considering dating and wanting to watch “Supernatural” or “The Walking Dead” or whatever parents have been deeming them too young to view but now they think they’re old enough. Maura isn’t like that. She’s still loving the same cartoon she watched four, five years ago, or more. Heaven forbid she finds The Wonder Pets on Amazon. Those little rodents still make her giggle.

Her progress is slow. Sloth-like at times. And other times, she will surprise you with her little newfound teen will and angst. She has discovered Supergirl, despite my trying to lure her to the Wonder Woman side of things. She likes Coldplay despite her aunt trying to influence her to the techno side of things. She has definite taste in clothes – I don’t even fight her anymore on styles, just sizes.

But then, there’s that moment, sitting in the car, her nose pressed into a Powerpuff Girls book and I am reminded yet again how she will live with us forever. Not in a bad way, or a burden-like way. Just in a “This is how things are” way. Because honestly? She and I get along so well, like things like going to bookstores and coffee shops and being sloths on the sofa together while eating pizza – what’s to complain about?

It’s just that sometimes, I look at her face and the softness to it, and am once again reminded that my baby is always going to be my baby in many ways.

 

 

 

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